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Amulet with a Lamashtu demon Amulett mit Dämon Lamashtu, Kalkstei, 700-600.vor Chr. Neu-Babylonisch, Mesopotamien   Metropolitan Museum

Amulet with a Lamashtu demon Amulett mit Dämon Lamashtu, Kalkstei, 700-600.vor Chr. Neu-Babylonisch, Mesopotamien Metropolitan Museum

Cat figurine, 664–30 B.C. Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Cat figurine, 664–30 B.C. Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Cat amulet - Late Period, Dynasty 26–29, 664–380 B.C., Egypt - Faience - The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

Cat amulet - Late Period, Dynasty 26–29, 664–380 B.C., Egypt - Faience - The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

mummy of a dog, collection of Metropolitan Museum of Art

mummy of a dog, collection of Metropolitan Museum of Art

Head of a cat, 664–30 B.C. From Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Funds from various donors, 1886 (86.1.80) #cats

Head of a cat, 664–30 B.C. From Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Funds from various donors, 1886 (86.1.80) #cats

Two cats surmounting a box for an animal mummy, 664–30 B.C. Egyptian. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Darius Ogden Mills, 1904 (04.2.601) #cats

Two cats surmounting a box for an animal mummy, 664–30 B.C. Egyptian. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Darius Ogden Mills, 1904 (04.2.601) #cats

Mastiff, ca. mid-2nd millennium B.C. Mesopotamia. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, The Charles Engelhard Foundation Gift, 1989 (1989.233) #dogs

Mastiff, ca. mid-2nd millennium B.C. Mesopotamia. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, The Charles Engelhard Foundation Gift, 1989 (1989.233) #dogs

Bronze Man and Dog - Metropolitan Museum. Neo-Babylonian, 8th–7th c. B.C. Mesopotamia

Bronze Man and Dog - Metropolitan Museum. Neo-Babylonian, 8th–7th c. B.C. Mesopotamia

The Babylonians believed that the demoness Lamashtu was responsible for still births and cot-deaths. A woman would have worn this quartzite stone amulet (now broken) during pregnancy and labour so that the fierce demons on it, and the incantation on the back, would scare Lamashtu away.

The Babylonians believed that the demoness Lamashtu was responsible for still births and cot-deaths. A woman would have worn this quartzite stone amulet (now broken) during pregnancy and labour so that the fierce demons on it, and the incantation on the back, would scare Lamashtu away.

Elephant, Late Naqada II (ca. 3650–3300 b.c.) Egyptian Serpentine, bone Few amulets from the Predynastic Period are known. In the past, Egyptologists identified these amulets as representing a bull's head, but the round face and eyes, the horns that curve inward to the face, and a snout with a defined ridge make a strong argument for its identification as an elephant.

Elephant, Late Naqada II (ca. 3650–3300 b.c.) Egyptian Serpentine, bone Few amulets from the Predynastic Period are known. In the past, Egyptologists identified these amulets as representing a bull's head, but the round face and eyes, the horns that curve inward to the face, and a snout with a defined ridge make a strong argument for its identification as an elephant.

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