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Little known picture of 11 in Scharnhorst in Baltic camouflage scheme, and with turret tops painted red, November/December 1940. Always graded as a battleship by the Germans, and protected as such, the Allies regarded her and sister Gneisenau as battlecruisers on account of their high speed (32 knots) and relatively light gun calibre.

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The Scharnhorst with the Atlantic bow.

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Das Schlachtschiff Gneisenau war das zweite Schiff der Scharnhorst-Klasse. Das 38.900 Tonnen verdrängende und 235 Meter lange Kriegsschiff war ebenso imposant wie nutzlos. Während der Seekrieg im Pazifik von den Flugzeugträgern geprägt war, war er im Atlantik vom U-Boot-Krieg bestimmt. Die Zeit der Schlachtschiffe war längst abgelaufen.

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Often reported to be Scharnhorst, this is in fact her sister Gneisenau: after reconstruction with raked 'Atlantic' bows and funnel caps (as here), Scharnhorst's mainmast was shipped much further aft, whilst Gneisenau's remained adjacent to her funnel. Critically damaged by RAF bombing shortly after the famous 1942 'Channel Dash', she never went to sea again.

A late view of 11 in battleship Scharnhorst, much pictured on this Board, seen in Norway, winter 1943. She was sunk by the Royal Navy at the Battle of the North Cape on Boxing Day that year whilst attempting to intercept an Arctic convoy.

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Fine early view of 11 in battleship Scharnhorst at Kiel before the 1939 modifications which shifted her mainmast further aft. She operated to considerable effect in the early years of WW2, generally in conjunction sister Gneisenau till the latter's irrepairable damage at the hands of the RAF in February 1942. Scharnhorst was sunk at the Battle of the North Cape on Boxing Day 1943.

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Scharnhorst@kriegsmarine

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Hochsteckfrisuren modern

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German 11 inch battleship Gneisenau, sister of the better known Scharnhorst - unlike the latter, her mainmast immediately abuts the funnel. She was critically damaged by RAF bombing after the famous 'Channel Dash' of February 1942, and never went to sea again: her wreck was scrapped in 1951.